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Lake James

8216 Lake James Drive, Lakeland, Florida 33810

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Welcoming 55+ Single Family Home Community of Lake James in Central Florida Features One Story Homes, an Eight Acre Lake and a Quiet Ambiance

Situated 55 miles southwest of Orlando in central Florida, the quiet 55+ community of Lake James is the brainchild of Ernie White Construction, an award-winning local company with more than 30 years of experience. Upon completion, the development will have 216 single family homes.

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Future residents can chose from 12 different floor plans. Dwellings focus on single level living, and sizes range from just under 1,500 square feet to well over 2,100 square feet. R-30 attic insulation, and Low-E windows are standard. Houses feature a lanai, a great room, a private master suite, and a two to three car garage. Driveways have paver bricks, and curbed sidewalks line the streets.

Both new and resale homes are available, and prices begin in the low-$200,000s. Please verify this price with a Realtor as prices may change. HOA fees cover clubhouse use and most lawn services.

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This gated community has an eight-acre lake at its heart, with walking paths snaking through common areas. The 2,000 square foot clubhouse has a multipurpose room with a catering kitchen. Lake James also maintains a heated outdoor pool and a fitness room with the latest in cardio and weight training equipment.

Lakeland is the home of more than a dozen golf courses and 38 named lakes. The inviting downtown is pedestrian friendly, bicycle friendly and is nestled along two of the lakes.The Polk Museum of Art has classes for adults and an extensive modern art collection. The Lakeland Center hosts the Imperial Symphony Orchestra, as well as a wide variety of dance and theater events. The Lakeland Community Theatre is in its 26th year and produces five shows every season.

Lakeland Regional Medical Center is accredited by the Joint Commission.

Summer temperatures are in the 80s and 90s, and winter temperatures are in the 40s, 50s and 60s. On average, the area receives 48 inches of rain per year.

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Visit www.lakejamesadultcommunity.com for more information. Go to tinyurl.com/y87hkajz for listings.

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Florida:

Sticking out into Hurricane Alley, Florida was a land no nation seemed to want. Ruled successively by Spain, France, England, and the Confederate States of America, the state had a backwater reputation. Other than St. Augustine and Pensacola, there were few cities. The area was rural and populated by frontier farmers.

In the late-1800s, changes came when railroads began chugging down both coasts. Industrialist Henry Flagler's Florida Easy Coast Railway even made it all the way to Key West. The Great Florida Land Boom, the build-up to World War II, and the space industry also helped turn Florida into one of the nation's most populous states. In 1900, there were about 500,000 residents. Today, there are more than 20 million, almost 351 people per square mile.

Why do people keep coming? Tourism marketing is one reason. Annually, millions visit Orlando's theme parks and the state's 663 miles of white sand beaches. Taxes generated by the billion dollar vacation industry allow Florida to prosper without a personal income tax. Budget-sensitive retirees have flocked to its cities and shorelines.

If you can ignore the hurricanes, the state's climate is relatively mild. Only five other states are sunnier. Florida's system of state universities and community colleges is sizable, and its big cities are meccas for culture and the arts. Sarasota is a good example. Its Ringling Museum Complex contains internationally known art museum, a circus museum, an historic theater, and a 66-acre garden. Museums near Orlando range from a Zora Neale Hurston gallery to a Madame Tussauds.

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Stats:

Population - 20,612,439

Persons 65 years old and over - 20%

High school graduates age 25+ - 87%

Bachelor's degree or higher age 25+ - 26%

Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin - 24%

White persons, not Hispanic - 55%

Median household income - $46,596

Median home value - $159,000

Persons in poverty - 16%

Social Security taxed? No

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

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55+ Communities

The concept of living in an active adult community started in the 1950s and 1960s. The first 55+ community was in Youngtown, Arizona and opened in 1954 (it removed its age restriction in 1999). Del Webb's Sun City, also in Arizona, opened in 1960 and is the longest-running 55+ community in the U.S. DelWebb is still building 55+ developments today.

Other builders, catching on to the baby boomer retirement wave, have also been building 55+ communities. Today the largest 55+ community is The Villages in central Florida. It has three zip codes, nearly 60,000 homes and sprawls across 200,000 acres.

People are drawn to these communities because most residents are of the same socioeconomic background. They share a common history and outlook. It is easy to make new friends and find a sense of community. And 55+ community amenities, particularly in newer developments, are especially appealing. They often rival resort amenities (and can be what drive costs up). Aside from summer camp or an all-inclusive resort, where can you find golf courses, marinas, planned activities, fitness centers and much more, all for one price?

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Communities by State

Alabama   Arizona   California   Colorado   Florida   Georgia   Nevada   North Carolina   Oregon   South Carolina   Tennessee   Texas   Virginia   Washington  

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