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retire retire

 

Weekly Edition ~ February 17, 2017

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"The four most beautiful words in the English language: I told you so." ~Author Unknown

 

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This Week's Community Review:

Rossmoor

Walnut Creek, California

Beautiful Walnut Creek is east of San Francisco in Northern California and is the setting for Rossmoor, a large, established, gated 55+ community with wooded grounds, condos, co-ops, single family homes, two golf courses, five clubhouses, a bounty of activiites and events and more.

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Previous Weekly Reviews:

Palm Shores, Boynton Beach, Florida

Along the southeastern Florida coast, Boynton Beach is the setting for Palm Shores, an established 55+ community with inviting, single story Mediterranean-style homes. Amenities include a clubhouse, a swimming pool, tennis courts and a theater for live performances. Residents gather regularly for coffee, potlucks and more.

Swansgate, Greenville, South Carolina

Greenville is a shopping and dining hub in northwestern South Carolina and is the setting for Swansgate, a cozy, gated 55+ community with patio homes and condominiums. The grounds are wooded and dappled with streams, mature trees, a pond and a gazebo. Amenities include a clubhouse, a swimming pool, walking paths and more.

Little Manatee Springs, Wimauma, Florida

Wimauma is about 20 miles inland from Florida's Gulf Coast and is the setting for Little Manatee Springs, a well-kept 55+ manufactured home community that is nearly surrounded by Little Manatee River State Park. It has gated access, palm trees, spring-fed lakes, a nine hole golf course, covered RV parking, nature trails and more.

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How Ranch Homes Changed America

The Ranch style is America's most pervasive building style. More than a single architectural form, this building movement addresses the needs of American life, and has been adapted for a wide variety of construction methods. Like any popular trend, Ranch homes have also endured their share of criticism over the decades, although demand for them has remained strong.

A made-in-America tradition, the Ranch movement traces its roots back to southwestern colonial architecture of the 17th to 19th century. These buildings usually had single story floor plans, and were constructed with simple materials and native plants to meet the needs of their inhabitants. Adobe covered with brick and plaster was commonly used for Ranch walls, while roofs were low and simple, usually with wide eaves providing shade from the summer heat.

As the name suggests, this practical building style was also used for homes on Ranches across the southwest. Many large Ranch homes came to include U-shaped floor plans, courtyards, and large front porches.

The first modern wave of Ranch building was known as California Ranch style. Early 20th century California architects Cliff May and William Wurster are often credited with developing the style, which stressed three basic concepts: livability; flexibility; and unpretentious character.

Livability was the most immediate benefit of Ranch homes, as the single floor layout allowed more more connection between inside and outside, as well as much larger main rooms. Homes could now be built according to lifestyle rather than architectural guidelines. Flexibility was seen in the open floor plans of California Ranchers, where rooms could easily flow from one to the next, and be used for multiple purposes without as much regard for space constraints. The unpretentious character of Ranch homes is evident in their simple, clean lines and low profiles.

These homes were not designed to create a statement, or evoke past styles, but to provide ease of movement. As such, California Ranchers came to embody the look of a "home," as opposed to an architectural method. Easily recognized within popular culture, Ranch imagery enables advertisers and film-makers to quickly evoke certain aspects of the American lifestyle.

Not all themes evoked by Ranch imagery are positive, however. For many, Ranch homes represent cultural emptiness, and a bland, unfocused lifestyle often associated with the term "suburbia." The functional, flexible nature of Ranch homes makes it easy for these criticisms to stick.

But renowned modernist real estate developer Joseph Eichler might not have been so quick to discredit the ranch movement. More than 11,000 of his attractive and distinct single story homes were built throughout northern California between 1950 and 1974, and are now in high demand among discriminating home buyers. The Eichler style, with its low-lying, airy concept and attractive shaded features, is a direct descendant of the Ranch style, and an example of how valuable the movement has been to American architecture.

~Regent Property Group offers the highest level of service for Austin real estate buyers and sellers. Visit their website to learn more about the company, take advantage of their free local property search, and find information on specialized Austin commercial real estate services. Article Source: Ezines.

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